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Write: Artists' Studio Tour by Sonya Paclob

From left, painter and teacher Marion Stephenson helps with her Dover Township student Jewel Stough's painting in her home at 721 S. George St., York. Photo by Sonya Paclob

From left, painter and teacher Marion Stephenson helps with her Dover Township student Jewel Stough's painting in her home at 721 S. George St., York. Photo by Sonya Paclob

Published for the York Daily Record 11/13/14

An artist's studio can be a place for therapy, teaching and a source of inspiration. The art can be displayed at public galleries, but the artist's creative space is sometimes behind closed doors.

This weekend, several York artists will give the public a glimpse into their homes and studios for the Artists' Studio Tour: Makers Dozen.

The tour is a community collaboration to showcase 12 full-time artists, said Kim Heindel-Toner, organizer and owner of Terra Opera Pottery. The public can walk through the historic homes and purchase paintings, pottery, jewelry and speciality holiday items.

Painter and teacher Marion Stephenson will open her 1890s Queen Anne Victorian home on 721 S.George St. She hopes the visitors will understand that talent can be found at the local level.

"I think people will be surprised that York has highly talented artists," Stephenson said.

Impressionistic pastel paintings of all sizes decorate the white walls of her home. Several pictures are scenes of European alleyways, cafes and market places while other were landscapes of body of water.

Kim Heindel-Toner, organizer of Artists' Studio Tour: Makers Dozen, stands among her handmade pottery items at her studio and shop Terra Opera Pottery in York.  Photo by Sonya Paclob

Kim Heindel-Toner, organizer of Artists' Studio Tour: Makers Dozen, stands among her handmade pottery items at her studio and shop Terra Opera Pottery in York. Photo by Sonya Paclob

Five students stood at their easels as they worked on individual paintings recently. Jewel Stough of Dover Township, has been studying with Stephenson for six weeks and say she's more motivated surrounded by her art.

"When I walk through the door, I feel inspired and it helps me as a painter," Stough said.

Handmade Makers Dozen banners will be displayed outside of each artist's place. The public will receive a map, which was handmade and designed by the artists. The maps are uniquely folded in a Turkish way that resembles origami.

Heidel-Toner suggest visitors to drive to each location due to distance in the area. Some artists will have light refreshments, give demonstrations, host other artists and sell assortment of handmade items for the holidays. The public is also encouraged to ask questions about their artistic process.

Vince Butera, owner of Butera The Florist has held presentations and enjoys people who are fascinated by his flower arrangements. "I want to educate the flower consumer and show them what I do," he said.

Kim Heindel-Toner, organizer of Artists' Studio Tour: Makers Dozen, points on the original map that was handmade and designed by other artists on the tour in her home in York. Those participating in the tour will be given the map, which marks locations of the artists' homes.  Photo by Sonya Paclob

Kim Heindel-Toner, organizer of Artists' Studio Tour: Makers Dozen, points on the original map that was handmade and designed by other artists on the tour in her home in York. Those participating in the tour will be given the map, which marks locations of the artists' homes. Photo by Sonya Paclob


Write: Paint Nite in Pennsylvania bars pairs art with fun by Sonya Paclob

isa Middendorf, Paint Nite instructor guides her participants in painting the "Decorative Wine" on canvas at Bogey Macaws. The event encourages non painters to come together with friends and have a drink, Middendorf said. She holds sessions at the restaurant every Monday that can host at about 40 participants in a private room.  Photo by Sonya Paclob

isa Middendorf, Paint Nite instructor guides her participants in painting the "Decorative Wine" on canvas at Bogey Macaws. The event encourages non painters to come together with friends and have a drink, Middendorf said. She holds sessions at the restaurant every Monday that can host at about 40 participants in a private room. Photo by Sonya Paclob

Paint Nite is not your typical art class. For one thing, it's for adults. For another, it takes place in a bar.

Across southcentral Pennsylvania, painters of all levels gather to create art, drink and be merry. At the end of the night, they have a 16-by-20-inch artwork to take home.

Instructor Lisa Middendorf recently taught her 100th class. She's been teaching since March for the national organization that has the slogan, "Drink Creatively."

"It's so gratifying for me," she said. "I have helped someone achieve something that they're proud of."

Last Monday at Bogey Macaws American Grille in York Township, about 44 participants gathered for an evening of fun.

Each lime green apron-clad participant sat in front of a tabletop easel with water-based acrylic paints. They listened to Taylor Swift and Usher as they painted. Chatter and laughter filled the room.

Naomi Munkittrick from Dillsburg paints on her canvas with a brush and holds her burger in the other hand during Paint Nite at Bogey Macaws American Grille in York Township. Munkittrick admitted she was starving and said, "When you are a mom, you learn to multitask."  Photo by Sonya Paclob

Naomi Munkittrick from Dillsburg paints on her canvas with a brush and holds her burger in the other hand during Paint Nite at Bogey Macaws American Grille in York Township. Munkittrick admitted she was starving and said, "When you are a mom, you learn to multitask." Photo by Sonya Paclob

For two hours they followed Middendorf's step-by-step instructions, sipping cocktails and eating appetizers. They took a 15-minute Drink and Dry break to let the paint dry, buy another drink and admire one another's work.

Everyone's techniques are unique, Middendorf said, "You have about 30 people and 30 different paintings."

Jennifer Hull, licensee of Paint Nite, brought the events to Pennsylvania and Northern Maryland last year. She conducts classes around the county and has seen an increase in popularity among women. She understands not everyone is a painter but wants people to relax and start with the basics.

"It's like Bob Ross in a bar," she said, referring to the popular PBS TV painter.

There are five Paint Nite instructors in Pennsylvania, according to Middendorf. Tickets are available for 34 classes in November with venues in Chambersburg, Mechanicsburg, Gettysburg, Hanover, Camp Hill, New Cumberland, Carlisle and Etters.

Write: 24-Hour Comics Day Challenge by Sonya Paclob

The Pennsylvania College of Art & Design holds Skype sessions with other artists during the 24-hour Comics Day Challenge in Lancaster. Several students, alumni and faculty create their own 24 graphic novel page in 24 hours starting Saturday, Oct. 4. SUBMITTED

The Pennsylvania College of Art & Design holds Skype sessions with other artists during the 24-hour Comics Day Challenge in Lancaster. Several students, alumni and faculty create their own 24 graphic novel page in 24 hours starting Saturday, Oct. 4. SUBMITTED

FlipsidePA publication for Thursday, Oct. 4, 2014

Pennsylvania College of Art & Design faculty encourages students to catch as much sleep as possible before 24-hour Comics Day in Lancaster. The challenge is a global event for students and professionals artists to create a 24-page graphic novel in 24 hours.

There are no prizes to win, but in the end, students walk away with a feeling of accomplishment. The local event, in its third year, will start Saturday, Oct. 4. Robert Hochgertel, chair of the illustration department hopes students gain confidence and efficiency when working on a deadline. It seems impossible to create a comic book from conception to publication within the allowed time he said, but he has seen an improvement from last year's participants.

"They (the students) produce more and better work than they thought they could ever," he said.

About 40 current students and 15 alumni are estimated to participate this year. They can on their own individual graphic novel or work in a team.

Charles Ferguson-Avery, a senior illustration major and student chapter president of the National Society of Illustrators, is ready to take the challenge for the third time. It's pretty easy at first he said, but when midnight hits, many students are running on coffee to stay awake.

"However, despite it being an incredibly strenuous and mentally taxing event, everyone truly wants to be there working alongside each other," Ferguson-Avery said, "Partially for the sake of rising to such a challenge and also as a way to walk away with something we're proud of."

Professional artists will critique others work throughout the process. Last year, the college Skyped with students in Singapore, who also participated in the event. Through the challenge, the college connects with video online chats to several groups and artists around the world.

"Depending where they are, they (the students) will be inspired by others work," Hochgertel said.

The challenge is open to students and professional artists, but not the general public. Any artists interested in the challenge can contact Hochgertel by email, rhochgertel@pcad.edu.

The college will also host a public event before the challenge called,"The growing cultural acceptability of Manga and graphic novels, and the influence of comics on American culture."

The discussion starts at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3 at the college. The panel will feature Toyin Odutola, Mosaic Project artist and Jamar Nicholas, artist and educator. It will also feature PCA&D educators Bob McLeod and Mike Hawthorne who both has done work for Marvel and DC Comics.